Culture & Traditions

Cultures and Traditions takes a look at how people interact with each other. This might be through sub-cultures, relationships, fads or religion and spirituality.

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April 1 gives the sneakiest ones among us an excuse for some shenanigans. Out of ideas for this year's springtime skulduggery? HowStuffWorks has 10 gags to completely confuse someone's day.

By Cristen Conger

Whether you're carving, stenciling or painting your pumpkin, we've collected five easy ways to create out-of-this-world pumpkin designs.

By Maria Trimarchi

Halloween is for tricks and treats... and partying! We have 10 cool party ideas for kids, teens and parents alike.

By Maria Trimarchi

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To get to the bottom of why black cats got a bad rap and where revelers can catch glimpse of a ghost, treat yourself to these 10 frighteningly fun Halloween facts.

By Cristen Conger

We have five tricks to making Halloween noise that has you covered whether you're a digital music downloader or a do-it-yourselfer.

By Maria Trimarchi

You don't need to be a pumpkin-carving Picasso to think outside the typical jack-o'-lantern box, you just need a little spark to get you going.

By Maria Trimarchi

At its core, feminism is the belief in equality. It's a movement and a philosophy that seeks to eliminate the social, cultural and legal barriers between men and women. Its goal is to create a truly egalitarian society.

By Cristen Conger

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Not every woman whose head scrapes the glass ceiling responds by burning her bra. These five feminist movements highlight proactive efforts to change gender stereotypes and claim equality for women in the boardroom, bedroom and voting booth.

By Cristen Conger

Snip, snip -- that's the sound of a baby losing his foreskin. Circumcision is a common medical practice in many parts of the world. Where did this tradition come from? And is it something we should stop?

By Tom Scheve

A lie grows until it's as plain as the nose on your face, says Pinocchio's fairy friend. But if you don't see a long nose (or pants on fire), how do you spot a fib?

By Tom Scheve

Between 1910 and 1970, nearly 100,000 Aboriginal children were taken from their birth parents and placed in white foster homes as part of a government plan to phase out the Aboriginal race. So where are these children today?

By Alia Hoyt

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Money for admission? Check. Willing companion to hold onto during your visit? Check. Second set of pants in case yours are scared off? Check. You're now ready to enter a haunted house.

By Cristen Conger

One piece of diet advice is not to snack until you're hungry enough to eat an apple. But what about consuming human flesh? Is cannibalism about hunger, power or desperation? And is it alive and well in our modern world?

By Josh Clark

Potatoes. Moles. Time capsules. Some things just belong underground and thrive in that dark, airless environment. Humans have long preferred topsoil to the subterranean, but some designers are looking to change that.

By Josh Clark

Before you board the crab boat for your first fishing gig, the captain tells you to ditch the suitcase and the banana. This is deadly work. Are you really going to argue with superstition?

By Debra Ronca

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It might be called flavor tripping, but there are no drugs involved. People pop a berry known as miracle fruit and marvel as sweet becomes sour and savory becomes sweet. What is this magical berry? How does this "miracle" happen?

By Molly Edmonds

From exchanging rings to saving the top layer of the cake, weddings are full of quirky traditions. When it comes to the custom of carrying the bride over the threshold, it's less about chivalry than it is about chastity and spirit intrusion.

By Josh Clark

At the end of the day, do you like to unwind with a cold drink? Perhaps a bubble bath or a nice, long walk? If beating someone to a bloody pulp is more your style, you may be in luck: A real-life fight club could be just a Web search away.

By Josh Clark

Chinese parents on the hunt for creative baby names are turning to the Olympic Games for inspiration. Just don't try to name your new baby "@".

By Maria Trimarchi

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Would you eat fried worms? While eating bugs is culturally taboo in the Western world, plenty of people around the globe enjoy a nutritious insect snack.

By Charles W. Bryant

With Mount Everest as a backdrop, Sherpas live and work at elevations that cause visitors altitude sickness. Learn more about the Sherpa culture and the respect they garner for their mountain mother.

By Cristen Conger

Hundreds of people are protesting down the street. The police arrive and find -- no one? The protesters are gone, but how did they know what to do?

By Josh Clark

Everything new is old again in the world of steampunk. Steampunk artists overhaul technology with a neo-Victorian style. But what makes the gadgets so expensive?

By Jonathan Strickland

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In the 1960s, the Beatles joined Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in his Himalayan ashram. Their interest in meditation undoubtedly influenced their music. But are they responsible for introducing yoga to the West?

By Janel Chatraw

Totem poles are, quite literally, family trees. They're massive tree trunks carved with symbols to commemorate family history and special occasions.

By Alia Hoyt