Relationships

Relationships are about how humans relate to one another. Learn more topics like love, marriage, genealogy, dating and divorce.

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Even if your family budget does not leave room for luxuries such as college application coaches, you may still be guilty of overparenting. How do you know if it's time to step back?

By Cristen Conger

Peruse the parenting aisle in a book store, and you'll find myriad titles all espousing different methods for raising happy, healthy, well-adjusted kids. Which unconventional parenting methods have been snagging headlines lately?

By Cristen Conger

Famous moms are everywhere these days. Every website and tabloid showcases the babies of celebrities. But the 10 mothers we're featuring were world-changers as well.

By Cristen Conger

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Homosexuality has become increasingly accepted, yet social resistance to gay parenting still simmers, often hinging on bygone stereotypes. What myths can scientific evidence dispel about same-sex parents?

By Cristen Conger

The social trappings and expectations of fatherhood have been in constant flux for centuries. How exactly have men's roles as parents changed over the years, and what difference do dads make in children's lives?

By Cristen Conger

Being famous doesn't make you a good parent – some of these fathers wouldn't really deserve a Dad of the Year award. Still, each of the dads on this list is a fascinating case study in how living in the spotlight mixes with raising kids.

By Cristen Conger

Going back to antiquity, lust arguably has gotten short shrift, thanks to its well-known association with the Seven Deadly Sins. Yet, without lust the human species would've died off a long, long time ago. How does it help promote long-term mating?

By Cristen Conger

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In the face of heartbreak, music can offer incomparable solace. But is listening to breakup songs just a self-indulgent exercise in sappiness? Or does it actually possess pain-mitigating properties?

By Cristen Conger

Many adults rate relationship breakups among the worst events of their lives. How does the psyche handle that kind of heartache? And is there a secret formula for mending a broken heart?

By Cristen Conger

How many movies have you seen where a glimpse across the room is enough to convince a protagonist that the search for love is over? Silly, right? Some scientists don't think so. Is love at first sight possible?

By Molly Edmonds

Infants and toddlers tend to be extremely self-centered. They haven't yet developed the ability to think of anyone but themselves. That changes for most kids at around age 3 or 4, when they develop theory of mind. But what is it?

By Josh Clark

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Is it possible to love more than one person? Those who practice polyamory think so, taking on multiple romantic relationships at the same time. Aside from logistics, there's potential jealousy and the social stigma that comes with it. Just how do they make it work?

By Molly Edmonds

Today's version of marriage looks very different from the unions enjoyed by our ancestors. For most of human history, marriage was more akin to a business deal between men, and the bride in question had very few rights or other options. So how did marriage become associated with love?

By Molly Edmonds

Does waving your arms around while you talk affect how people perceive your words? Yes, it does. In fact, you may not need to "choose your words" at all.

By Charles W. Bryant

Traditionally, men have served as the breadwinner for a family while women governed the domestic sphere. But have the tables turned? And is the recession behind it?

By Molly Edmonds

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Economists have long argued that women play a key role in lifting a nation out of poverty, yet the traditions and religions in the developing world have often blocked their progress. How do we break the cycle and find the path to gender equality?

By Molly Edmonds

Sometimes it seems that men and women speak two different languages. It's hard to see eye to eye because of the vast differences in the ways men and women communicate. Click on to see pictures of something to talk about.

Love -- is it really all we need? Scientists and songwriters agree that love is one of the most important aspects of being human, but why do we get that familiar head rush when we meet someone we like? As it turns out, most of the fun of falling in love lies in the pursuit of that special someone.

By Josh Clark

For Fundamentalist Mormons, plural marriage is the Divine Principle, reflecting God's wish that his people are "fruitful and multiply." But how does the principle work in practice?

By Julia Layton

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While mainstream LDS Mormons haven't publicly advocated polygamy in more than a century, fundamentalist break-off sects thrive throughout North America. How, if plural marriage is illegal, are tens of thousands of people marrying more than one spouse?

By Julia Layton

In kindergarten, it may have been the girl who always gave you the frosting from her cupcake. As an adult, it may be the guy who will answer the phone at 2 a.m. when you need to talk. How do you define a friend?

By Alia Hoyt & Molly Edmonds

You can get a pretty good idea of how American society interprets gender by walking through the children's section in a typical clothing store. But not everyone fits into these ideas of what boys and girls should be. What do sex and gender even mean?

By Molly Edmonds

Much of country music would have gone unwritten without someone's cheatin' heart, and we can't underestimate the importance of extramarital affairs to centuries of written drama. But in real life, how do men and women differ when it comes to breaking their marital vows?

By Molly Edmonds

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How often have you seen a couple interact like oil and water throughout an entire romantic comedy, only to realize that they're fated to be together? Princes marry scullery maids and Harvard lawyers fall for the mechanics who fix their cars. Is there any science to the story?

By Molly Edmonds

A lie grows until it's as plain as the nose on your face, says Pinocchio's fairy friend. But if you don't see a long nose (or pants on fire), how do you spot a fib?

By Tom Scheve