Culture & Traditions

Cultures and Traditions takes a look at how people interact with each other. This might be through sub-cultures, relationships, fads or religion and spirituality.


It doesn't get more awkward than the check arriving and no one knows who's paying for what. Is it rude to expect birthday guests to pay for their own meal?

Is your heart broken? There is a place that will house its souvenirs.

The prosperity gospel is one of the most popular forms of Christianity in the entire world. But where did it come from and how did it get so big? And why do critics say it gives a false picture of Christianity?

Are Catholic priests more prone to becoming sexual predators because they take a vow of chastity? Or was the sexual abuse scandal that rocked the church not unique to the religious institution at all?

Which of these would you like to see on your computer keyboard?

Times Square may be iconic for ringing in the new year by dropping its ball, but plenty of other locales drop stuff, too, like, say, a giant bologna. Or an opossum.

Parson Brown? Yuletide? Do you have a clue what the lyrics of Christmas carols are talking about?

The legendary jolly figure isn't exactly the same across cultures. In China, Santa totally plays the saxophone.

Until now, it would be difficult to find a tattoo artist willing to ink your loved one's DNA into your skin. But times are changing in the tattoo world.

Although there's no official record that the late Fats Domino and Chubby Checker ever met, these music legends have common ground.

Throughout the world, Christmas celebrations reflect local culture and traditions, and they all share in the wonder of the season. Learn more about the various Christmas traditions you'll find in countries around the world.

Megachurches and prosperity gospel teach parishioners if you pray for it ... it will come.

Middle names aren't a purely modern invention, so why do we still have them?

Hazing is traditionally associated with college pranks, but it's gotten deadlier over the past two decades. It's also spread to high schools and other institutions. What accounts for this increase and why do people allow themselves to be hazed?

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree in New York City may be an iconic symbol of the holidays, but how well do you know this tree-dition?

Think you can feed your family of 10 at Thanksgiving for less than $50, total? The American Farm Bureau Federation says you can.

You were probably used to red squiggles showing up for spelling errors and green ones for grammatical errors in Microsoft Word documents. But why was the red usually right and the green usually wrong?

You know them. They're the people who act like they're not mad, but really are. They're passive aggressive and say some of these five zingers.

More people are opting for cremation over traditional burials and in some states they can choose a water cremation.

From claims of secret bank accounts created by the government to exemptions from federal law, sovereign citizen beliefs seem outlandish. But is there any truth to them?

Cornelia Bailey was the unofficial historian of Sapelo Island, Georgia, who helped spread the word about its unique Geechee culture. But after recent death, will residents be able to hold on to their heritage?

The cutest, most courageous and craziest stories of the week at HowStuffWorks.

They're been living in Myanmar (formerly Burma) since the 12th century, yet they've been persecuted by the Buddhist majority for decades. Here's why.

What does Boston have against the letter R? Why do Minnesotans sometimes drag out the 'O' sound?

Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a dotard. Here are some equally entertaining, out-of-date options the 45th president could've thrown back in his face.