Government

Government is a key part of any society and culture. Learn more about different types of government, politics and civic issues.

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A handful of other countries have electoral colleges, but they're very different in function and purpose from the one that decides U.S. presidential elections.

By Patrick J. Kiger

President Trump has threatened to use emergency powers to build a border wall without Congressional approval.

By Patrick J. Kiger

If you follow politics long enough, there'll be headlines that make you wonder if a U.S. president can really do that thing you just read about. Take our quiz to learn what's within a president's rights.

By Nathan Chandler

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Encryption grants your data privacy, while locking out others, including law enforcement. Could encryption ever stay strong and grant law enforcement access?

By Greg Fish

When the federal government shuts down, U.S. government employees aren't the only ones affected. There's a pronounced chain of events that happen the longer the fed is closed.

By John Donovan

Congress is at odds over the federal budget, and a deadline is looming. If they can't agree, the government could shut down. We'll tell you what to expect if it does.

By John Perritano

If the U.S. vice president must step up and become president, who becomes vice president?

By John Donovan

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Among the line of cramped toilet stalls, there's usually a larger one reserved for people with disabilities. But if no one seems to need it, is it OK to borrow it?

By Alia Hoyt

He wants YOU, but who the heck was he?

By Stell Simonton

Is sending federal troops to the U.S.-Mexico border even legal? As it turns out, a U.S. law called the Posse Comitatus Act has something to say about it.

By John Donovan

The 2018 California wildfires have called attention to the private firefighting industry. Can anyone hire a private, personal firefighting team?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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President Donald Trump proudly declared he is a 'nationalist,' much to the chagrin of many Americans. Still others support his comment. So what exactly does it mean?

By John Donovan

Ruth Bader Ginsburg may have been tiny, but she left a huge mark on the U.S. judicial system in the 27 years she served on the Supreme Court, more than earning her nickname the "Notorious RBG."

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Your home's totaled. You have no cash. No supplies. And nowhere to go. Now what?

By John Donovan

Former U.S. presidents draw a hefty pension for life, but what about members of Congress? You might be surprised to know where your tax dollars are going to fund their retirement.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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It's also known as "maternity tourism," and defined as travel to the U.S. for the purpose of having a child on American soil.

By John Donovan

Midterm elections in the U.S. don't get the public excited the way presidential elections do. But there's a lot at stake, actually, during these contests. Why do midterms exist, anyway?

By Dave Roos

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination certainly isn't the worst the U.S. has seen. Anybody remember Harriet Miers?

By John Donovan

Though treason is the only crime mentioned in the U.S. Constitution, few know what the word actually means and fewer still have ever been indicted for it.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Unlike other emergency alerts, you can't opt out of this one.

By Sarah Gleim

Now you have no excuse not to vote in the midterms.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Federal law doesn't require Americans to have a fixed address in order to vote, but state and local laws often pile on additional restrictions that make it hard for the homeless to cast a ballot.

By Dave Roos

A new and comprehensive study finds corruption is lower in countries that have more women in elected roles.

By Laurie L. Dove

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When a Supreme Court justice retires, there's a lot of speculation and political maneuvering regarding the replacement. Find out how Supreme Court justices are nominated, who is qualified to serve and how a nominee is approved.

By Ed Grabianowski

In the age of endless information, are voters too distracted to make informed decisions?

By Diana Brown