Government

Government is a key part of any society and culture. Learn more about different types of government, politics and civic issues.

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It's common knowledge that if the president of the United States dies or is removed from office, the vice president takes over. But what happens if the V.P. is unavailable?

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

Politicians have given the world plenty to talk about over the years. On this list of 10 political scandals, from Watergate to the Profumo Affair, which had the most extreme consequences?

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd. & John Kelly

While all rehab centers and programs aim to treat addiction, not all offer the amenities of an upscale resort. Learn about rehab's beginnings in prohibition and the types of treatment available today.

By Josh Clark

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Your presidential candidate has a MySpace page. Learn how campaign communications technology has changed the way races are run and won.

By Dave Roos

Presidential pardons restore a person to the state of innocence they had before they committed a crime. But how does the process work and can it go too far?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Are you up to date with your passport or e-passport? It's a must-have when you're traveling out of the country. Read up on the latest laws and watch videos on cutting-edge passport technology.

By Nicholas Gerbis

Supporters claim it's been instrumental for security investigations and terrorist arrests, while critics counter that it gives the government too much power and undermines democracy. Let's take a look at what the Patriot Act is, what people say about it, and whether it's really working.

By Ed Grabianowski

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E-mail is now protected from secret government searches thanks to a recent U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling. Read about this landmark e-mail privacy ruling.

By Jacob Silverman

A virtual border fence uses a complex network of cameras and radar to detect illegal border crossers. Find out how a virtual border fence system works.

By Jacob Silverman

The U.S. Marshals Service is the oldest law enforcement agency in the nation. Learn about famous U.S. Marshals and the duties and history of U.S. Marshals.

By Ed Grabianowski

Spies have shaped foreign policy, altered the course of wars and left a deep (though usually hidden) impression on world history. It's a tense and often deadly job.

By Ed Grabianowski

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Would you be more willing to vote if you could sidestep the nuisances of finding the correct polling location and standing in line for hours increase voter participation? E-voting could make it possible.

By Kevin Bonsor & Jonathan Strickland

The United States is involved in a massive expansion in the DNA-collecting capabilities of the federal government. Find out who this law affects and about the controversy surrounding DNA databases.

By Julia Layton

When the FBI announced two years ago that it no was longer using its Carnivore Internet surveillance software, it seemed like a victory. Find out why the techniques employed in the new ISP-based surveillance approach may be even more evasive.

By Julia Layton

This New Year's Eve, at midnight on the dot, hundreds of millions of pages of U.S. government secrets will be revealed.

By Julia Layton

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A U.S. soldier is about to deploy to Iraq for his third tour of duty. While he's gone, his wife may be deported to Guatemala while his son is left in limbo. What's behind immigration laws?

By Jacob Silverman

In a document released in November 2006, the Department of Homeland Security revealed aspects of a targeting program that most citizens and many lawmakers didn't know about.

By Julia Layton

The Darfur region of Sudan has been in a state of crisis since 2003. Whether what's going on in the African province qualifies as genocide is a point of international debate.

By Julia Layton

Recently, a child was born on a flight from London to Boston. The plane landed in Nova Scotia. How do you determine which country the child is an official citizen of? Find out in this article.

By Julia Layton

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Instead of "Democrat or Republican," the more pressing question has become "accurate count or complete debacle?" With e-voting, the entire setup is electronic, not just the actual casting of the vote.

By Julia Layton

Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra was in New York, preparing to address the United Nations as the leader of Thailand, when he found out he was out of a job. Learn how a coup d'etat works.

By Julia Layton

President Bush once referred to the "War on Terror" as "the war against Islamic fascism." Is that an accurate portrayal?

By Julia Layton

The FBI's Top Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list has been an unqualified success since its inception in the 1950s. Learn how they choose its members.

By Julia Layton

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In an interview, New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin reportedly answered a question about flooded vehicles with the statement, "You guys in New York can't get a hole in the ground fixed, and it's five years later. So let's be fair." Learn why, or whether, the WTC memorial project is behind schedule.

The idea behind 9-1-1 is pretty simple: Give people a single, easy-to-remember number to call to receive help during any life-threatening situation. Learn how 9-1-1 got started and how it works.

By Julia Layton