Legal System

The Legal System Channel features information related to how society deals with crime, criminals and law enforcement. Learn more about how governments operate their legal systems.

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The U.S. has declared martial law in the past, but only sparingly and in dire situations. So, what would it take for the president to use it now?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Recording a video that could potentially become evidence in a criminal case can make your life very complicated. So what do you need to consider before you pull out your phone?

By Patrick J. Kiger

On the advice or orders of your elected leaders, you've been 'sheltering in place' and limiting outside activities. It's starting to feel like you're on house arrest, just without the ankle bracelet. But how similar is it really?

By Dave Roos

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Intersectionality was originally a legal way to recognize that people who were members of more than one identity group deserved equal treatment. But critics have charged that intersectionality has fostered a sort of 'oppression Olympics.'

By Dave Roos

Some Supreme Court cases are so well known they're often referred to by their case names (ever heard of Roe v. Wade?) But what were the cases really about and what did they decide?

By Dave Roos

The brutal Colombian drug lord was a millionaire in his 20s but died in a hail of gunfire the day after his 44th birthday.

By John Donovan

During the holiday season, chances are you'll get several packages mailed to your house. Are you worried about package theft? We've got some tips to derail porch pirates.

By Dave Roos

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A new documentary by director Sam Bathrick follows rapper Todd "Speech" Thomas of Arrested Development as he works with inmates in a Virginia jail to create music and change lives.

By Stell Simonton

They may have been hard-bitten crooks, but when John Dillinger, Arthur Barker and "Pretty Boy" Floyd were at large, ordinary citizens loved to follow their exploits. Find out what you know about these and other gangsters with our quiz.

By Mark Mancini

Red flag laws allow police to seize the firearms of a person who is viewed as a potential threat to commit a violent act, without charging them with a crime. But how often do they prevent mass killings?

By Patrick J. Kiger

There's a huge police presence in the U.S. school systems today. But has that presence allowed educators to push off their management of school misconduct to the cops?

By John Donovan

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As far as we know, it has never happened, but a murder in space would most definitely create numerous jurisdictional, legal and investigative complications.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Eighty-seven years ago today, the FBI took down America's first true celebrity criminal and the country's Public Enemy No. 1.

By Oisin Curran

The suicide rate in American jails is triple that of the general population. It comes down to something called "the shock of confinement." What is that and how can suicides be prevented in jails?

By Nathan Chandler

The National Neighborhood Watch Program was originally established in 1972 as a local response to neighborhood crime. How has the idea evolved over time?

By Tara Yarlagadda

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Forgery is one of the most difficult crimes to successfully carry off. But these six sure tried. What tripped them up?

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The food we're feeding those incarcerated in the U.S. prison system is not only bad for their health, but it's also bad for John Q. Taxpayer's wallet.

By John Donovan

You probably don't know her name, but Mitsuye Endo was the plaintiff in the landmark lawsuit that ultimately led to the closing of the U.S. Japanese internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The big blacked-out sections of the Mueller report are calling attention to redaction. The process of redaction can be sophisticated or simple. And sometimes, not completely fool-proof.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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A new groundbreaking study shows how widespread incarceration in the U.S. really is.

By Nathan Chandler

A new serial podcast delves into the tragic deaths of at least six members of the Hart family, whose SUV was driven off a cliff in California in early 2018.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Cursing during road rage? A ton of trash in your car? Both can get you in trouble if you're not careful. What other crazy driving laws are on the books?

By Cherise Threewitt

The Constitution allows Supreme Court justices to be impeached by the House and put on trial by the Senate, but it's only happened once and that was in 1805.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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One out of every six American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape, and many are afraid to or don't know how to report it.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Melissa Moore struggles to reconcile the normal experiences of growing up with her father, Keith Hunter Jesperson, with the realization that he was also the Happy Face serial killer. And she wonders if being a psychopath could be hereditary.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus