Law Enforcement System

The Law Enforcement Channel investigates how law enforcement agencies operate. Find out more about police, SWAT teams and other agencies.

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You've probably seen at least one video of someone berating a store employee about why they don't have to wear a mask. So how much can retail stores do to police the mask mandates?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Amid the furor over George Floyd's death while in custody, there have been increasing calls to cities to divert funding away from police departments to other means of solving social problem. But how does that work?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The U.S. has declared martial law in the past, but only sparingly and in dire situations. So, what would it take for the president to use it now?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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On the advice or orders of your elected leaders, you've been 'sheltering in place' and limiting outside activities. It's starting to feel like you're on house arrest, just without the ankle bracelet. But how similar is it really?

By Dave Roos

As far as we know, it has never happened, but a murder in space would most definitely create numerous jurisdictional, legal and investigative complications.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Cursing during road rage? A ton of trash in your car? Both can get you in trouble if you're not careful. What other crazy driving laws are on the books?

By Cherise Threewitt

Police and fire departments across the U.S. are eliminating jargon like "10-4" in favor of every-day vernacular. And there's a good reason why.

By John Perritano

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Omarosa did it, but does that mean you can too — legally that is? A lot depends on which state you live in.

By Dave Roos

The new law is being hailed as a victory for women tired of being harassed on French streets.

By Laurie L. Dove

Ordinary citizens are allowed to make arrests in every U.S. state, but legal experts warn that it's a risky thing to do.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Stand Your Ground laws are controversial and exist in nearly half the states in the United States. But what exactly are they?

By Jerad W. Alexander

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In the United States, attorney-client privilege works to keep communications between an attorney and his or her client secret. But there are always exceptions to the rule.

By Oisin Curran

The conviction of 80-year-old Bill Cosby on aggravated indecent assault charges raises the question of how sentencing works in the case of an elderly defendant.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The United States doesn't have a national ID, but it's slowly moving toward one with the REAL ID law. But what happens if a citizen doesn't have identification?

By John Perritano

Hotels/motels must balance guests' privacy with the safety of other guests and employees.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Drowning in debt? Your driving privileges could disappear.

By Cherise Threewitt

The Logan Act prohibits American citizens from going behind the back of the U.S. government to deal with foreign powers. So why hasn't anybody ever been convicted?

By John Donovan

Reports of famous people being accused of sexually harassment have been all over news sites and social media. What does U.S. law actually say sexual harassment is?

By Alia Hoyt

Ending federal pot prohibition could mean big changes and big bucks for states.

By John Donovan

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If the risk of being hit by a moving vehicle isn't enough to get your eyes off your phone, the threat of a fine may do the trick.

By Kate Kershner

Antarctica belongs to no one nation. So what happens in the event of a crime?

By Dave Roos

While the press often gets a beating from the public and politicians, journalists have brought to national attention lots of issues that would otherwise remain hidden.

By Patrick J. Kiger

After you get a speeding ticket, you've probably mumbled (after the police officer left, of course) something about being stopped to satisfy a quota. Well, you're probably right. Lots of police departments have speeding ticket quotas.

By Cherise Threewitt

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After you get a speeding ticket, you've probably mumbled (after the police officer left, of course) something about all this being some kind of racket. Well, you're probably right. Many police departments depend on traffic ticket revenue.

By Cherise Threewitt

Johnny Law has some new flying toys that could come in handy in the fight against crime.

By Chris Opfer