Lawsuits

The Lawsuits Channel contains information relating to the non-criminal aspects of the court system.

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"Trigger" laws are state laws designed to take effect once a right is no longer protected by the U.S. Constitution. 13 U.S. states have anti-abortion laws that will activate if Roe vs. Wade is overturned.

By Naomi Cahn

So, how many strawberries does it take to make strawberry Pop-Tarts? Way more than Kellogg's uses, according to a class action lawsuit.

By Laurie L. Dove

About seven in 10 Americans log on to social media, the Pew Research Center reported in April 2021. By the time a high-profile court case rolls around for jury selection, there's a good chance they've heard something about it. Can the impartial jury system survive the digital age?

By Thaddeus Hoffmeister

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The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the challenge to the restrictive Mississippi abortion ban Dec. 1, 2021. What does it mean for Roe v. Wade? Could the landmark case be overturned?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

On most U.S. shorelines, the public has had a time-honored right to "lateral" access to beaches. That sandy space, however, is being hotly contested.

By Thomas Ankersen

Pop princess Britney Spears has been locked in a conservatorship since 2008. Hers isn't a typical conservatorship for many reasons. We'll explain.

By Sarah Gleim

What's the difference between defamation, libel and slander? And what legal standards must be met to prove one in a court of law?

By John Donovan

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When Barbra Streisand sued a photographer who took a photo of her house, the ensuing publicity called far more attention to the picture than it would have gotten otherwise. And that's not the only time attempted censorship has backfired.

By Dave Roos

Intersectionality was originally a legal way to recognize that people who were members of more than one identity group deserved equal treatment. But critics have charged that intersectionality has fostered a sort of 'oppression Olympics.'

By Dave Roos

Some Supreme Court cases are so well-known they're often referred to by their case names, like Roe v. Wade. But what were the cases really about, and what did they decide?

By Dave Roos

You probably don't know her name, but Mitsuye Endo was the plaintiff in the landmark lawsuit that ultimately led to the closing of the U.S. Japanese internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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The big blacked-out sections of the Mueller report are calling attention to redaction. The process of redaction can be sophisticated or simple. And sometimes, not completely fool-proof.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The Constitution allows Supreme Court justices to be impeached by the House and put on trial by the Senate, but it's only happened once and that was in 1805.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Does this mean that a website actually is responsible for the content created by that site's users?

By Jonathan Strickland

Online ordination may be quick and easy and presiding at a friend's wedding may be fun and meaningful. But these marriages haven't always held up in court.

By Dave Roos

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TripAdvisor deleted — and later reinstated — a hotel review where a visitor alleged she had been raped. How can review websites legally balance their duty to warn users as well as to beware of false, defamatory content?

By Dave Roos

A lawsuit in federal court in Colorado seeks to establish that the Colorado River ecosystem has legal rights similar to those of a person.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The controversial case in the tiny Tennessee town of Dayton drew national media attention — and live apes. But all that spectacle wasn't for naught.

By Kate Kershner

Richard and Mildred Loving's interracial marriage was against the law. But it led to the Supreme Court's historic decision in 1967 to ban anti-miscegenation laws across the country.

By Kate Kershner

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Research shows that nicotine residue lingering in furniture and carpets may be hazardous to kids. Could that mean legal action for unsuspecting homeowners and tenants?

By Dave Roos

The divisive serial comma finally got its day in court—it was glorious.

By Laurie L. Dove

If someone is insulting you or your family and you clock 'em, can you get away with it, legally?

By Dave Roos

Companies are actually hoping you won't read these 8,000-word documents before you click "agree." But why?

By Dave Roos

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Good Samaritan laws are intended to protect you from a lawsuit if you help strangers during an emergency. But they may not protect you in every situation.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

The Supreme Court has ruled in a big Fourth Amendment case that under certain circumstances, evidence found during an illegal stop could be used in legal proceedings.

By Ben Bowlin