Legal System

The Legal System Channel features information related to how society deals with crime, criminals and law enforcement. Learn more about how governments operate their legal systems.

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A jury in Kenosha, Wisconsin, found Kyle Rittenhouse not guilty on all charges. A Harvard legal scholar weighs in on why the verdict directly challenges the legal standards for self-defense.

By Ronald Sullivan

A major failure in crowd control is likely to blame for the deaths at Travis Scott's Astroworld Festival. What went so disastrously wrong?

By Joanna Thompson

So, how many strawberries does it take to make strawberry Pop-Tarts? Way more than Kellogg's uses, according to a class action lawsuit.

By Laurie L. Dove

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True crime is often stranger than fiction. How much do you know about some of the strangest and most notorious criminals out there like Ted Bundy, Jack the Ripper and the Night Stalker?

By Alia Hoyt

About seven in 10 Americans log on to social media, the Pew Research Center reported in April 2021. By the time a high-profile court case rolls around for jury selection, there's a good chance they've heard something about it. Can the impartial jury system survive the digital age?

By Thaddeus Hoffmeister

Indigenous women have been going missing and been murdered along an infamous stretch of highway in British Columbia since the 1960s. But not much is being done to find them — or who killed them.

By John Donovan

The 2,300 officers and staffers of the U.S. Capitol Police are charged with keeping order in and around the U.S. Capitol, safeguarding Congress and, yes, defending democracy.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Texas just passed the most restrictive ban on abortion since Roe v. Wade became law in 1973. And the Supreme Court will hear a case challenging a Mississippi ban this fall. Could Roe be overturned?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Two terrorism experts weigh in on the group behind the deadly Kabul airport attack and its rivalry with the Taliban.

By Andrew Mines & Amira Jadoon

Cities like Chicago are spending millions for high-tech systems that can identify and pinpoint the exact location of a gunshot. But are these systems worth the price tag?

By John Donovan

On most U.S. shorelines, the public has had a time-honored right to "lateral" access to beaches. That sandy space, however, is being hotly contested.

By Thomas Ankersen

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Pop princess Britney Spears has been locked in a conservatorship since 2008. Hers isn't a typical conservatorship for many reasons. We'll explain.

By Sarah Gleim

Ed Gein was known as the "The Butcher of Plainfield" for killing two women in the late 1950s. But he was also the inspiration for iconic horror movie characters, including Psycho's Norman Bates and Texas Chainsaw Massacre's Leatherface.

By John Donovan

The Netflix documentary "This Is a Robbery" attempts to solve the 1990 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist. Today, the 13 stolen pieces of artwork are worth around $500 million. Have you seen any of them?

By John Donovan

The legal difference between murder and manslaughter is unmistakable, even if the final result of both of those crimes is the same. So what sets these charges apart in a court of law?

By John Donovan

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The narrow legal definition makes it hard to charge and even harder to convict.

By Jeannine Bell

Despite how hard investigators work, some crimes just baffle even the most gifted detectives. They go cold. That's where these nine cases stand. Will they ever be solved?

By John Donovan

One day they were here and the next they simply disappeared. What happened to these 14 people? Will we ever know what happened to them or will their fates be unsolved forever?

By John Donovan

What's the difference between defamation, libel and slander? And what legal standards must be met to prove one in a court of law?

By John Donovan

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It takes a lot of legal maneuvering to free an innocent person from prison. And that takes a lot of money. That's why the Innocence Project is so critical to help free the wrongly convicted.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Racketeering didn't exist as a crime before 1970. So what is it and why was the Mafia instrumental in its creation?

By Dave Roos

You've probably seen at least one video of someone berating a store employee about why they don't have to wear a mask. So how much can retail stores do to police the mask mandates?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

When Barbra Streisand sued a photographer who took a photo of her house, the ensuing publicity called far more attention to the picture than it would have gotten otherwise. And that's not the only time attempted censorship has backfired.

By Dave Roos

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Amid the furor over George Floyd's death while in custody, there have been increasing calls to cities to divert funding away from police departments to other means of solving social problem. But how does that work?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The gangster most known for facilitating the creation of the modern American Mafia was the head of organized crime in New York City in the 1930s. But the U.S. government asked for his help during World War II.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky