Legal System

The Legal System Channel features information related to how society deals with crime, criminals and law enforcement. Learn more about how governments operate their legal systems.


One out of every six American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape, and many are afraid to or don't know how to report it.

Melissa Moore struggles to reconcile the normal experiences of growing up with her father, Keith Hunter Jesperson, with the realization that he was also the Happy Face serial killer. And she wonders if being a psychopath could be hereditary.

Police and fire departments across the U.S. are eliminating jargon like "10-4" in favor of every-day vernacular. And there's a good reason why.

William Burke and William Hare cut out the middleman in the early 19th-century Scottish grave-robbing game.

Omarosa did it, but does that mean you can too — legally that is? A lot depends on which state you live in.

The new law is being hailed as a victory for women tired of being harassed on French streets.

Ordinary citizens are allowed to make arrests in every U.S. state, but legal experts warn that it's a risky thing to do.

Political ideology serves as a motivator for some people to commit espionage, but it's not the only factor at play when someone decides to spy.

In the vast majority of cases, a child, parent, spouse or friend who goes missing returns home unharmed. But if they don't, would you know what to do first?

Stand Your Ground laws are controversial and exist in nearly half the states in the United States. But what exactly are they?

An active shooter situation at work may not be common, but you should really know how you'd handle it before it happens.

Psychics often try to help police solve crimes, but how many times are they really successful?

Nondisclosure agreements used to be stuffy legal documents reserved for safeguarding company secrets. Now they've been in the news as part of sexual harassment coverups. What are NDAs exactly and when can you break them legally?

President Donald Trump says if the U.S. just deports members of the MS-13 gang, the country will be much safer. But is it really that simple?

From public letters to anime porn, the 470,000 public files offer a window into the last years of al-Qaida mastermind Osama bin Laden.

In the United States, attorney-client privilege works to keep communications between an attorney and his or her client secret. But there are always exceptions to the rule.

Where do we draw the line between interesting and appalling?

For the first 100 years, this amendment got little attention. But since the 20th century, Americans have been vigorously debating what exactly the "right to bear arms" means.

Gay men have been the target of many serial killers. The cases often go unsolved because men fear they'll be outed as gay if they talk. Do you hold the lead to solve one of these crimes?

The conviction of 80-year-old Bill Cosby on aggravated indecent assault charges raises the question of how sentencing works in the case of an elderly defendant.

The Mann Act was passed in 1910 and even though it's been used legitimately, it's also been abused to nab men of color like Jack Johnson and Chuck Berry.

High-profile cases over the past few years have shown the benefits — and pitfalls — of asking the public to report any suspicious activities they notice to the police. When does that tip over into racial or ethnic bias?

Does this mean that a website actually is responsible for the content created by that site's users?

Drug courts have changed the lives of the thousands of people who've "graduated" through the program. But how exactly do the judges, rehab facilities and counselors facilitate these courts, and do they deter repeat offenders?

Online ordination may be quick and easy and presiding at a friend's wedding may be fun and meaningful. But these marriages haven't always held up in court.