Political Elections

The Elections channel includes information on topics related to elections, voting or running for political office. Learn more about presidential debates, the electoral college or the voting system.


Do you remember boring campaign ads? Of course not. That's why campaigns spend millions of dollars to send messages to voters. Here are five ads that worked -- and that's why we remember them.

There may be no perfect way to cast a ballot. Human error, hanging chads, and hackable software -- it seems every voting system has some flaw.

Voter suppression has become a hot topic during the 2016 election season, but the practice has a frighteningly long and storied history in the U.S. What is it and how can it affect elections?

If the news is any indication, Americans have officially caught recall fever. Why (and how) are everyday voters taking the extraordinary step of recalling officials they've already elected to their posts?

The presidential election season is chock-full of straw polls, caucuses and primaries to determine the nominees for each party, but what's the difference between these things? Do they matter?

News broadcasts and Web sites are filled with polls detailing public opinion on everything from the president's job performance to stem cell research. But who selects the people who respond? And what do the numbers mean?

Sarah Palin has one, and comedian Stephen Colbert does too. But what exactly is a Super PAC, and how will they affect future elections?

The vice presidency was originally a consolation prize given to the runner-up in the national election. More than two centuries later, the role of vice president is little more respected among the public than it was in the beginning.

When the framers of the Constitution considered an executive branch, they were still stinging from the despotic rule of King George III. Ultimately, the framers saw the need for a single person to lead. Enter the president of the United States.

What role did these powerful politicians play in the Democratic nomination? And what makes a superdelegate so super anyway?

Once a president reaches the end of a second term, everyone begins looking for his or her successor. How much influence do so-called lame ducks wield?

Presidential primaries let the voters choose who they want to represent their political party for president. But not everyone is happy with the process. What are the problems, and can they be fixed?

Candidates drool over it. Campaign managers turn gray from it. Super Tuesday is the second-most important Tuesday in the American election process. What is Super Tuesday? And why aren't all the states involved?

Would you be more willing to vote if you could sidestep the nuisances of finding the correct polling location and standing in line for hours increase voter participation? E-voting could make it possible.

Instead of "Democrat or Republican," the more pressing question has become "accurate count or complete debacle?" With e-voting, the entire setup is electronic, not just the actual casting of the vote.

In an election year, political conventions take over the U.S. media for days, filling TVs, radios and newspapers with political-party platforms and propaganda. But what real purpose do the conventions serve?

A caucus, like a primary, is held to determine the party's nomination for president. Those candidates face their first big test during the Iowa caucuses. Why is it such an unusual piece of the election process?

With the United States at war with Iraq, male U.S. citizens between the ages of 18 and 25 are, in effect, on notice. Find out what would happen if the military needed more troops.

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?

In the U.S. presidential election system, the Electoral College plays an extremely important role in determining who the next president will be. Learn about the Electoral College system in this article.

State dinners are hosted by the president of the United States to honor a visiting head of state -- kings, queens, presidents or head of a government. How do you prepare for a state dinner?