Education

Education includes information on learning and career training. Learn more about topics like homeschooling, college-prep, career paths and more.

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In the United States, there's Harvard University. In the U.K., there's Oxford University. Each is the oldest in its respective country, though neither has been around quite as long as the oldest university in the world.

By Sascha Bos

A pilot program in the Atlanta Public School system is teaching students de-escalation strategies during one of the city's worst crimewaves in decades. Will it work?

By Dave Roos

Here are four alternative venues where the general public can enjoy nature, engage in hands-on science learning and get a behind-the-scenes look at scientific research in action.

By Jill Zarestky

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Science education methods are changing as a result of the Next Generation Science Standards, which aim to define a uniform vision for K-12 science education across the U.S.

By Meenakshi Sharma

Critical race theory (CRT) is a hot button issue in the United States. School boards and state legislatures in seven states have passed regulations banning it from being taught in the classroom. How did we get here and why is everyone freaking out?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

How long can seeds last underground and still be capable of germinating? One botanist set out to discover this 142 years ago, and his experiment is still running.

By Jesslyn Shields

The world's most beloved chalk was pulled back from the brink of extinction, to the relief of the world's mathematicians and chalk enthusiasts.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The coronavirus is forcing many parents to form at-home 'learning pods.' But who could potentially benefit from these and who could be left behind?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Jane Elliott has been exposing racist thinking for more than 50 years through her ground-breaking exercise using eye color. Some think her methodology is too harsh. She couldn't care less.

By John Donovan

Deaf and blind from a fever as a baby, Helen Keller overcame her limitations to lead a life of inspiration and courage. How was she able to learn to communicate?

By John Donovan

The decision about whether to attend a college or a university is largely a matter of preference, but how do you know which is the better choice for you?

By Laurie L. Dove

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Fellow graduates, as you go forward and seize the day, we pause to consider some less-clichéd and far more memorable commencement speeches given over the years.

By Laurie L. Dove

The very first honorary degree on record was a brazen attempt to score points with a wealthy and politically connected bishop in 1478. Not much has changed since then.

By Dave Roos

Defining plagiarism is not always cut-and-paste easy. But it usually involves deliberately passing off somebody else's original expression or creative ideas as one's own.

By John Donovan

Cramming for a test might help you pass, but it doesn't provide long-term learning and that's the problem.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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In a study on academic integrity, 59 percent of high school students admitted cheating on an exam, and 34 percent admitted to doing it more than twice.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The College Board wants AP World History courses to cover material from the year 1450 on. The rest, well, is history.

By John Donovan

Free kids books that come out of a vending machine? Yes, please!

By Yves Jeffcoat

It used to be common for kids to walk to school by themselves but not any more. A study found several benefits when children walked unaccompanied.

By Alia Hoyt

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Secretive Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen is the leader of a politically powerful Turkish religious movement — and head of the largest chain of charter schools in America.

By Diana Brown

Do public school dress codes and uniforms have any real value or are they sexist and arbitrary?

By Alia Hoyt

Experts advocate teens start school slightly later in the morning, but not all parents give the idea a passing grade.

By Laurie L. Dove

Not all pencils are created equal. There's a reason why teachers and school supply lists specify one pencil brand.

By Alia Hoyt

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Think you're a visual learner? How about auditory? Sorry, that's preference; education is best tailored to the subject matter, not the student.

By Jesslyn Shields

It might not be sophisticated, but some people with dyslexia say it's the only typeface they can read.

By Jesslyn Shields