Schooling

Schooling comes in many forms -- from traditional K-12 education to college and the pursuit of advanced degrees. Learn all about schooling here.

Learn More

Critical race theory (CRT) is a hot button issue in the United States. School boards and state legislatures in seven states have passed regulations banning it from being taught in the classroom. How did we get here and why is everyone freaking out?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The Food and Drug Administration has authorized emergency use for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for kids 12 and up. Can it also mandate students be vaccinated before they return to school this fall?

By Kristine Bowman

The world's most beloved chalk was pulled back from the brink of extinction, to the relief of the world's mathematicians and chalk enthusiasts.

By Jesslyn Shields

Advertisement

Are you considering a straight-up online school for your child? Here's what you need to know before you make the switch.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The decision about whether to attend a college or a university is largely a matter of preference, but how do you know which is the better choice for you?

By Laurie L. Dove

The very first honorary degree on record was a brazen attempt to score points with a wealthy and politically connected bishop in 1478. Not much has changed since then.

By Dave Roos

In a study on academic integrity, 59 percent of high school students admitted cheating on an exam, and 34 percent admitted to doing it more than twice.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Advertisement

Louisiana has the dubious honor of being the U.S. state with the biggest bullying problem.

By Chris Opfer

The decades-old LSAT test is losing its hold on law school admissions. What will this mean for prospective graduate students?

By Laurie L. Dove

It used to be common for kids to walk to school by themselves but not any more. A study found several benefits when children walked unaccompanied.

By Alia Hoyt

Secretive Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen is the leader of a politically powerful Turkish religious movement — and head of the largest chain of charter schools in America.

By Diana Brown

Advertisement

Do public school dress codes and uniforms have any real value or are they sexist and arbitrary?

By Alia Hoyt

Experts advocate teens start school slightly later in the morning, but not all parents give the idea a passing grade.

By Laurie L. Dove

Not all pencils are created equal. There's a reason why teachers and school supply lists might specify a specific pencil brand.

By Alia Hoyt

For tired teen students, a snooze during the school day can offer a much-needed pick-me-up.

By Shelley Danzy

Advertisement

Ever year, millions of high school seniors lose interest in school after they get into college. And every year, some of those students see those acceptances vanish.

By Julia Layton

A whopping 2.8 million students were suspended in the '13-'14 school year, which is likely more detrimental than beneficial to society.

By Julia Layton

And, for that matter, how do kindergarten teachers decide which students are smart?

By Kate Kershner

Advertisement

A five-year study of the BioEYES program found that students get excited about science when they get to work hands-on with growing zebra fish.

By Robert Lamb

Talk about minimal input for maximum result. An Arizona State University study found that encouragement from a female role model could keep some girls from dropping out of STEM classes.

By Jesslyn Shields

Researchers are figuring out cool ways to spur conversation between kids and caregivers. And all that talk can really help kids' language development.

By Kate Kershner

Students might be shocked to learn how little most of their professors are paid or that others have to raise funds for their own salaries.

By Dave Roos

Advertisement

Students in the U.S. haven't been as quick to adopt the post-high-school gap year as their international counterparts. While that time off isn't ideal for everyone, it has some very real advantages.

By Clint Pumphrey

For the past 40 years, U.S. neighborhoods have become increasingly segregated by income. Are school districts and mobile wealthy parents balkanizing our country?

By Jesslyn Shields