Education

Education includes information on learning and career training. Learn more about topics like homeschooling, college-prep, career paths and more.


From American Girl dolls to animal pelts to car repair tools, you may be surprised at the free stuff you can borrow from the library

Move over, Zuckerberg: A new study shows that children may just have adults beat when it comes to creativity and innovation in the tech sector.

Whether it's tag, jumping rope or playing with dolls, kids in every part of the world, and in every generation, play. Philosophers and psychologists say they do it for more reasons than just having fun. But the future of play may be in jeopardy.

TED talks are so popular, they've been spoofed in commercials, with speakers sporting wireless headphones against a black background. At 18 minutes each, how did these talks go viral?

Students have been taught via long distance for centuries, long before the birth of personal computers. Here's where the first distance learning courses began.

Seems like everybody in the world is signed up for a MOOC (massive open online course). But how many students actually finish their courses?

Seems like lending out ebooks should be a relatively simple matter for most libraries. But often, it's not. What are the challenges ebooks pose for libraries?

When it comes to finding an online school, the choices seem almost limitless. But how can you determine if the school is highly regarded?

Congratulations! You just graduated with an online degree. But will a degree earned online benefit you in the job market? Was all your hard work worth it?

Massive open online courses are the hot, new way to educate the masses. Will MOOCs make college obsolete?

All the studying in the world may not be worth it career-wise. Learn if potential employers take online degrees seriously.

When you start applying to various colleges, everyone says make sure the school is accredited. How do go about doing that?

Seems like the Internet is allowing us to do almost everything from home or from wherever we are at the moment. So how many Americans do their degrees remotely?

You have just finished that algebra MOOC from an Ivy League university. Awesome! But can you get college credit for your MOOC classes?

Want to ace that test? Skip the all-nighter and hit the sack to boost memory and learning.

Education still mainly consists of an instructor talking to a group of students, the same as it's been for at least 1,000 years. But what if that model could be overturned for good? And we're not talking MOOCs but something much more personal.

Staying awake in a college lecture is hard enough, but how about when you're at home watching the lecture on your computer, a few feet from your bed? That's the challenge of online learning. We have some tips to keep you on track.

In 2012, MIT and Harvard joined forces to create edX, a nonprofit offering free online college classes from some of the world's top universities. How does it make money?

Fellow graduates, as you go forward and seize the day, we pause to consider some less-clichéd and far more memorable commencement speeches given over the years.

When's the last time you wrote a cursive capital Q? Instruction in penmanship has dropped as digital communication eclipses pen and paper. But could cursive skills mean more than pretty loops on a page?

Free college courses from top universities sounds fantastic. That's the premise of MOOCs – hundreds of thousands of people from around the world can sign up. Is this the future of college education or an interesting fad?

Every year, 750,000 people in the U.S. take the branded battery of tests, hoping to earn the equivalent of a high school diploma.

It's touted as a barometer of academic success, but some critics say the NAEP is prone to false readings. Here's a look at the "the nation's report card" and what it tells us about the state of American scholastics.

Sixth grade is one of the biggest changes kids can make -- for some, it even means transitioning from elementary school to middle school. What will you discover this year?

Not everyone learns at the same speed, and the jump from fifth to sixth grade is an especially big one. When should a student repeat the fifth grade?