She hated going to the dentist, and, she cried the whole way there.

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She hated going to the dentist, and, she cried the whole way there.

So it may no longer share a spot with the question mark, but the comma is still a valuable key to know and use well.

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Wrong: She hated going to the dentist, and, she cried the whole way there.

Why: There's a comma after a conjunction joining two complete sentences.

Right: She hated going to the dentist, and she cried the whole way there.

Why: While a compound sentence, consisting of two complete subject-verb pairs, does need a comma before the conjunction, it does not take one after the conjunction. A conjunction does, however, take a comma afterward if what immediately follows it is a nonessential clause (She hated going to the dentist, and, although she knew it would do no good, she cried the whole way there).

Next, perhaps the most egregious comma error …

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