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10 Ways Television Has Changed Sports


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Cheerleaders
Cheerleaders, such as this squad from Duke University at a 2011 basketball game, help add to the excitement of sports, even for those watching the game on TV.
Cheerleaders, such as this squad from Duke University at a 2011 basketball game, help add to the excitement of sports, even for those watching the game on TV.
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

The birth of organized cheerleading took place on Nov. 2, 1898, when University of Minnesota student Johnny Campbell led the crowd in a cheer of, "Rah, Rah, Rah! Sku-u-mar, Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! Varsity! Varsity! Varsity, Minn-e-so-tah!" [source: The Kennedy Center]. Then, pre-World War II, male "yell captains" appeared at sporting events.

These cheerleaders proved sufficient to whip up excitement in the stands. But have you ever seen cheerleaders from a seat high in the bleachers? It's not nearly as immediate an experience as seeing the same cheerleaders shot close-up from either a high or a low angle.

The modern conception of cheerleaders is a product of television.


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