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When does a habit become a tradition?

What You Need to Build a Tradition

Paxson made a habit of shooting jump shots in his driveway as a kid. His habit -- practicing -- made him better at the game of basketball. But no matter how many times the ball swooshed through the hoop, he wasn't taking part in a tradition. First he needed to link that skill to a unit, a team, and then shoot the shot with a particular motivation -- to honor, commemorate or extend the legacy of a squad that had won the NBA Championship the preceding two years.

Motivation is a core component of tradition. The repeated actions of a group of people don't rise to the level of tradition without having an element of honor, respect or at least acknowledgement of the past [source: Becker].

Once a habit has grown beyond an individual to a group and has been repeated with the intention of commemorating something or someone, it needs just one other component to become a full-fledged tradition -- time [source: Longman].

Understand that this is not a hard science -- the exact amount of time that must pass is open for debate -- but traditions (think carving the Thanksgiving Day turkey or coloring eggs on Easter) are often measured in years, not days or weeks. In fact, if you consider one of the formal definitions of tradition from Merriam-Webster Dictionary, you could make a strong case that it takes a significant number of years before an activity can rightfully be called a tradition.

Merriam-Webster notes that it must be handed down "from one generation to another" to be defined as such. Another definition of tradition from Merriam-Webster, however, simply says the activity must be part of an "established or customary pattern" which could, conceivably, be a much shorter amount of time [source: Merriam-Webster].

Habits can, certainly, turn into traditions but not until they broaden in their scope of participants, deepen in terms of their motivations and stand up to the test of time.

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