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5 Traditions for Teaching Kids to Read

Tackle Trouble Spots

The fact is, all brains want to learn: young brains specifically. After all, it's what they're designed to do. Philosophers and teachers have often described teaching as nothing more than establishing an environment for students to teach themselves. It can be difficult to remember this when common learning disabilities or inconveniences -- like dyslexia, dysgraphia, hyperactivity or attention deficit disorder -- crop up, but it's also essential. Our children want nothing more than to impress us with their radical skills, and when they run into roadblocks, it's frustrating for all of us.

It could be a physical problem, delayed motor skills, hearing issues or even problems with eyesight that aren't obvious. Perhaps a child doesn't want to read because her school environment isn't set up to cater to her particular learning style. In that case, supplementing her work with home reading and activities can help bolster her confidence. Maybe your child gets bored because he's not engaged with the material and would be more interested in extra subject matter that's more to his liking.

It doesn't really matter what they're reading, after all: For a child who has lost the wonder of reading, a comic book or exciting film version of a classic tale can do as much to excite her and bring her back to the passion of learning as the "Dick and Jane" that might be alienating her at school. But by identifying the pressures and concerns of your particular child's reading situation, you can find a way to put all that advice, momentum and excitement to use.

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