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5 Traditions for Exploring Science


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Expand Your Horizons
Whether you're peering through a telescope or scoping out ancient fossils, field trips give your family access to more cool scientific sights and tools than you might have at home.
Whether you're peering through a telescope or scoping out ancient fossils, field trips give your family access to more cool scientific sights and tools than you might have at home.
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Take field trips. Head to museums, particularly ones designed around science, such as Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, San Francisco's Exploratorium, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., or one near you. Children's museums all over the world include science exhibits; even ones that appeal to a broader age group typically offer installations geared toward educating youngsters.

Stimulating environments, such as oceans, deserts, forests or even toolsheds and garages, can really fire a child's imagination, so make it a point to trek to them from time to time. Put on some old shoes, wander down to a creek and "go creekin.'"

You don't have to leave home to delve deeper into topics. Web sites like, well, HowStuffWorks.com teach the inner workings and scientific principles underlying the components of our everyday existence -- a real lifesaver when kids keep asking questions and you want them to find reliable answers. Some sites, such as Houghton Mifflin's Science Education Place, offer curriculum resources tailored by age group. Still, there's no substitution for applying what you've learned to …


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