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10
Who Am I?
Aging Couples

In 1890, the median age of first marriage was 22 for brides and 26.1 for grooms. During the 1950s and 60s, ages dropped to 20.3 for women and 22.8 for men. Marrying ages have been getting steadily older since then, with a 2010 median age of 26.1 for brides and 28.2 for grooms [source: Pearson Education].

Who Am I? is a game designed to be an icebreaker and get guests talking with each other. There's a tame version for traditional showers with female guests of mixed ages and interests, a version for couples' showers and a full-contact version for the more adventurous:

  • Tame version: As each guest comes into the shower, the host tapes the name of a well-known person on her or his back. It can be the name of a book or movie character, a person from history, a famous person, a local celebrity or a family member. Guests keep the names they see on other guests' back secret. The object of the game is for each guest to discover her or his party personality. To do that, they must ask each other questions like, "Am I male or female…Am I in politics…Am I related to the bride?" While the answers are limited to "yes" and "no," it starts the ball rolling on interactions between guests who may not know each other. One or two questions might even lead to a real conversation.
  • Couples' version: Each couple that comes to the shower is tagged on the back with one half of a famous couple. Couples could be famous lovers -- Bonnie and Clyde, Sonny and Cher -- or well-known pairings, like bacon and eggs. The tags should be mixed up, so actual couples aren't tagged as a pair. Throughout the game, couples can't talk to their partner. Instead, they question other guests to discover their identity. Once a guest unlocks the secret of her or his alter identity, she or he must find the other half of the duo.
  • Full-contact version: In this version of the game, the bride is blindfolded. She must then feel each guest and guess who they are.
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